Five Golden Rules for a Successful Ubuntu Desktop Migration

Canonical

on 21 November 2011

So, you like the idea of deploying an Ubuntu desktop to all or some of your users. You like the way Ubuntu’s light-client model can give  your older desktop machines a new lease of life. You like the fact that Ubuntu is secure, portable, and easy to manage. Best of all, you like that it costs nothing to license, and comes with a host of enterprise-grade apps that cost nothing to license either.

Now it’s time to see how it works for you in the real world. To help you plan your migration, we’ve compiled our five golden rules for success. These are things we’ve learned from the hundreds of Ubuntu desktop migrations we’ve conducted for clients around the world – from the French National Police Force to the Supreme Court of India.

 

Download today and discover how to:

  • Plan effectively for maximum effect
  • Target the users ripe for migration
  • Identify the apps that save you money and hassle
  • Create the right management flows
  • Pilot your project to get it just right

Talk to us today

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