Why a Canonical blog?

Jane Silber

on 22 January 2008

Welcome to the Canonical Blog. The goal of the blog is to provide a vehicle for people who work for Canonical to respond to some of the questions we get asked, to explore the issues we care about, and to expand on some of the initiatives in which we are involved. It is a companion piece to the Fridge, Planet Ubuntu and to Mark’s blog but it is different as it is not the voice of the Ubuntu Community.

It is the Canonical (capital C) voice. It is (we hope) the considered opinion of people within Canonical with a valuable perspective on a specific topic. It is here to address that gap where a press release is over the top but we want to respond to an issue or we want to provide more colour on an announcement, where we want to provoke debate or bring attention to something that we feel is important.

We live in interesting times in computing and at Canonical we are fortunate to find ourselves at the centre of a lot of the more interesting developments. We hope this blog develops into a useful perspective on these issues.

– The Canonical Team

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