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Ubuntu Certification Is Changing

Canonical offers a commercial certification programme where manufacturers (OEM & ODM) can apply for their systems to be validated and endorsed to work with Ubuntu.  We had two levels of endorsement for systems: “Ubuntu Certified” and “Ubuntu Ready”. Successful applications to the certification programme results in a certificate for the system being listed at Ubuntu.com/Certification

“Ubuntu Certified” is an endorsement by Canonical over the lifetime of an Ubuntu release, this includes ongoing validation of Security and Stable Release Updates for the certified system.”Ubuntu Ready” is an endorsement by Canonical at a specific point in time of an Ubuntu release and provides no re-assurance over future release updates.

Are you confused yet? We recognise that the differences between these endorsement levels is quite granular and perhaps not obvious to consumers. In order to simply things, we are planning to close down the “Ubuntu Ready” programme in time for Ubuntu 11.10 release in October.

The take away of the changes is that from 11.10 there will only be one Canonical-endorsed certification programme:“Ubuntu Certified“.

If you are familiar with the Ubuntu Ready programme, you might be asking yourself:

What will happen with the existing “Ubuntu Ready” Certificates?

We will no longer be offering new “Ubuntu Ready” services to OEMs or ODMS. Cutomers with existing “Ubuntu Ready” tokens will still be able to redeem them for 11.04. The existing Ubuntu Ready certificates will be maintained on the public website until the applicable releases reach end of life.

“Ubuntu Ready” came with a set of  testing tools that allowed manufacturers to check if their systems worked with Ubuntu. Are these tools being removed too?
We will continue to offer testing tools to partners and the community. The objective is to have a single test tool for partners and the Ubuntu community that will be available within the standard Ubuntu image (from Ubuntu 11.10).

“Ubuntu Ready” did not require a manufacturer to provide Canonical with System samples. Does “Ubuntu Certified” have hardware requirements?

Ubuntu Certified will continue to require hardware to be submitted to Canonical by manufacturers for testing. Ubuntu fortnightly Stable Release Updates (SRUs) means that certified systems are required to be tested every two weeks to ensure no regressions are introduced. Ubuntu Certification testing can be used by partners as a way to assess if certification will be successful before engaging in a contract with Canonical.

Can a system be certified with a customised Ubuntu image?

An OEM or ODM shipping a pre-install custom ISO with their systems can apply for Ubuntu Certified if it is an approved Canonical image. These systems are clearly labelled as only certified if Ubuntu is supplied by the manufacturer at purchase time.

Any other questions?

I am sure we have left something out that might be in the back of your  mind, so please tell us!

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