Canonical joins GNOME Foundation Advisory Board

Will Cooke

on 1 November 2017

As you’re no doubt aware, the default Ubuntu desktop is now running GNOME Shell following the 17.10 release and so we naturally have a great deal of interest in the plans and direction of the GNOME project.  The best way for us to get more involved in the future of GNOME is to become a member of the Advisory Board, and so, I’m happy to announce that we are now fully signed up members.

The board’s responsibilities are summarised as: to meet with the GNOME Foundation board of directors to explain their needs, to learn more about the needs of GNOME users and to provide feedback on the overall direction of the GNOME project.

We hope to share the results of our many years of user research, testing plus the needs of our large and diverse user base to help map out the best way for the entire GNOME ecosystem to benefit from our membership.

The GNOME community have been very welcoming to Ubuntu, and we are already seeing the fruits of their labour in 17.10.  Night Light, Captive Portal detection, the new Control Center, and a host of new features are now available to Ubuntu Desktop users by default by way of the GNOME desktop.

We look forward to working closely with the GNOME Foundation, and to many years of happy collaboration.  

Ubuntu desktop

Learn how the Ubuntu desktop operating system powers millions of PCs and laptops around the world.

Newsletter signup

Select topics you’re
interested in

In submitting this form, I confirm that I have read and agree to Canonical’s Privacy Notice and Privacy Policy.

Related posts

Community Snapcrafter on MicroK8s, summits and the evolving nature of snaps

In January 2018, Dan Llewellyn joined his first Snapcraft Summit in Seattle in his role as a community Snapcrafter. At that event, we discussed his views on everything snap related from most requested snaps, new feature …

CMake leverages the Snapcraft Summit with Travis CI to build snaps

CMake is an open-source, cross-platform family of tools designed to build, test and package software. It is used to control the software compilation process and generate native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in any …

How to build a lightweight system container cluster

LXD, the system container manager, developed by Canonical and shipped by default with Ubuntu, makes it possible to create many containers of various Linux distributions and manage them in a way similar to virtual machines (VMs) …