Howdy, Windows! A Six-part Series about Ubuntu-on-Windows for Linux.com

I hope you’ll enjoy a shiny new 6-part blog series I recently published at Linux.com.

  1. The first article is a bit of back story, perhaps a behind-the-scenes look at the motivations, timelines, and some of the work performed between Microsoft and Canonical to bring Ubuntu to Windows.
  2. The second article is an updated getting-started guide, with screenshots, showing a Windows 10 user exactly how to enable and run Ubuntu on Windows.
  3. The third article walks through a dozen or so examples of the most essential command line utilities a Windows user, new to Ubuntu (and Bash), should absolutely learn.
  4. The fourth article shows how to write and execute your first script, “Howdy, Windows!”, in 6 different dynamic scripting languages (Bash, Python, Perl, Ruby, PHP, and NodeJS).
  5. The fifth article demonstrates how to write, compile, and execute your first program in 7 different compiled programming languages (C, C++, Fortran, Golang).
  6. The sixth and final article conducts some performance benchmarks of the CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network, in both native Ubuntu on a physical machine, and Ubuntu on Windows running on the same system.

I really enjoyed writing these.  Hopefully you’ll try some of the examples, and share your experiences using Ubuntu native utilities on a Windows desktop.  You can find the source code of the programming examples in Github and Launchpad:

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