Snappy Ubuntu Core now on the hypervisor of your choice with OVA

Canonical

on 15 January 2015

When we launched snappy Ubuntu Core, we introduced it on Microsoft Azure, Google Compute Engine, Amazon’s AWS and our KVM images. Immediately, developers were asking questions like, “where’s the Vagrant image?”, which we launched on 14 January 2015.

The one final remaining question was “where are the images for <insert hypervisor>?”. We had inquiries about Virtualbox, VMware Desktop/Fusion, interest in VMware Air, Citrix XenServer, etc.

OVA to the rescue

OVA is an industry standard for cross-hypervisor image support. The OVA spec allows you to import a single image to:

  • VMware products
    • ESXi
    • Desktop
    • Fusion
    • VSphere
    • VMware
  • Virtualbox
  • Citrix XenServer
  • Microsoft SCVMM
  • Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization
  • SuSE Studio
  • Oracle VM

To get the latest OVA image, click here. From there, you will need to follow your hypervisor instructions on importing OVA images.

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